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Abstract

At Michigan State, we have begun investigating some possibilities for creating and displaying photospheres in art history courses. Virtual reality-style presentation is particularly appealing for teaching architecture, archaeological sites, and other large, complex works that benefit from a spatial understanding that is otherwise difficult to communicate effectively when actual travel is not an option. Our pedagogical experiments are at a very early stage at this point, but the following report seeks to summarize and recommend various technical approaches to the tasks of creating and displaying virtual reality content in the context of visual resources.